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How to write an effective sponsor message

It’s not that hard to write an effective sponsor message.  Where people go wrong is when they try to say too much, and when they leave the listener out of it.  Think about keeping it simple, and think about how to include the listener in the message.

Here are a few tips:

Don’t try and say too much.  Pick one special thing to talk about and stick to it.

When saying your location, use landmarks or crossroads. Such as “Across from the Bank on Park Avenue.” Try to avoid using specific addresses, which may fly over the listeners head.

Write out numbers within the text, don’t just use numerals.   When someone else reads your message, this flows out of their mouth easier.

Adjectives and adverbs can easily be deleted to shorten the copy.

Save time by removing www before Web addresses.

After writing your message draft, read it out loud with a stopwatch. Read at an even, realistic pace, and time how long the message runs. Add or delete words to get the message to the right length. Do not try to read faster, just read it at a comfortable pace.

Remember the KISS rule.  Trying to say too much just muddles up the listener, and they won’t hear any of it.

Something to think about. Who and how many people are you talking to?  Perhaps surprisingly, you’re only talking to one person. A good goal is to speak like you’re telling this to one person. Speak directly to that person.

Here’s a run down of the architecture of an effective sponsor message:

Grab their attention. Not by being clever, cute or funny. (Example, “Valentines Day is almost here!”)

Associate the listener to your products and services. (Example, “Imagine surprising your loved one with a stunning bouquet arranged just for you.”)

Call the listener to action.  Repeat it. (Example, “Call Flora’s Flowers right now at 268-0516.  Don’t disappoint, delight instead. 268-0516”.)  Do not try to cram in your address AND your phone number AND your website.  Decide which action you want them to do, and tell them to do just that.

writing a radio sponsor message:
Guidelines:
Don’t try and say too much.  Pick one special thing to talk about and stick to it.
Use landmarks or crossroads when describing a location. Such as “Across from the Bank on Park Avenue.” Try to avoid using specific addresses, which may fly over the listeners head.
Write out numbers within the text, don’t just use numerals.
Adjectives and adverbs can easily be deleted to shorten the copy.
Save time by removing www before Web addresses.
After writing your draft, read the draft out loud with a stopwatch. Read at an even, realistic pace, and time how long the message runs. Add or delete words to get the message to the right length. Do not try to read faster, just read it at a comfortable pace.
Remember the KISS rule.  Trying to say too much just muddles up the listener, and they won’t hear any of it.
And perhaps the most important guideline.  Who and how many people are you talking to?  Perhaps surprisingly, you’re only talking to one person. A friend.  A good goal is to speak like you’re telling this to a friend. Speak directly to that person.
Here’s a run down of an effective sponsor message:
Grab their attention. Not by being clever, cute or funny. (Example, “Valentines Day is almost here!”)
Associate the listener to your products and services. (Example, “Imagine surprising your loved one with a stunning bouquet arranged just for you.”)
Call the listener to action.  Repeat it. (Example, “Call Flora’s Flowers right now at 268-0516.  Don’t disappoint, delight instead. 268-0516”.)  Do not try to cram in your address AND your phone number AND your website.  Decide which call to action you want them to do, and tell them just that.

This should start you off.  There is obviously much more to it than this, but surprisingly, the above is an excellent guide post to writing an effective sponsor message.